Our Imperfect Lives

In the Home Stretch

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We can see the end of the tunnel – the completion of the process of becoming eligible foster parents is in our sights. Our first two home visits (well really three as we ended up having to split our one-on-one interviews with the social worker into two separate visits) are as they say “in the books!” Next up is our final visit, which we will hopefully set soon for the next week or two, and then just paperwork on DCF’s side.

Our last two visits with the social worker were different because she met with us individually, so we’ll each give you a brief, and I’m sure riveting, account of our experiences. First up, since she had the first one-on-one meeting, is Meg:

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This is my first attempt at blogging (I usually act as the editor) so bear with me. The purpose of our individual meetings with our social worker was to shed some light on our individual experiences, perspectives, concerns, and so on. What I have found surprising about this process is how detailed some of the questions were.

When asked about my fondest childhood memory I had to say summer camp. Not that the rest was unpleasant, but camp was my favorite place. I have always enjoyed being independent, so living on an island and choosing my own schedule of activities (usually sailing, archery, crafts, swimming, and outdoor education) was the best. There was something simpler about camp friendships – maybe due to the lack of phones, hair dryers, make up, boys…? In fact, I still dream about being at camp pretty often – even though I last attended as a counselor in 1998. I hope we can (afford to) give our kids a similar opportunity.

When it comes to parenting I imagine our kids will have more “baggage” than we did and will therefore be more challenging to parent. We didn’t really have rules or punishments that I can recall growing up – but we didn’t push the limits too far either. (Did we?) I think one of the most important values that I learned about parenting from my parents was the importance of spending time together, and I feel very lucky to have so many great memories – whether at home, museums, camping, or spending time with our cousins, aunts, uncles, and grandparents. We were lucky to have so many people that cared about us. We are lucky now to have so many friends and family supporting us as we become parents.

Last, but of course by no means least, is Marcy:

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Well my one-on-one was short, sweet, and pretty dull. I generally don’t have much to say, particularly to people I’m not close with, but I also have a tough time looking back at my life and picking out singular moments as being the happiest of my childhood or the toughest. Thankfully my sad attempts at self reflection shouldn’t have any effect on our abilities to become foster parents.

I had a happy childhood. Like everyone I had fights with my siblings, I skinned my knees, and I had bouts of getting teased at school – but nothing that I can look back on and say, “Oh, that was a very difficult time to overcome.”  The mythical idea that high school was a torturous experience wasn’t true for me, I rather enjoyed high school. I loved being a high school athlete and I had a small but great group of friends – many of whom I’m proud to still consider good friends.

I also struggled to answer questions about my parents’ parenting methods and how my methods might differ. This again comes down to my recollection of my childhood being pretty great – I don’t have many, if any complaints. I think I turned out pretty well rounded and the same pretty much goes for my siblings.

It is interesting to note that our social worker observed something Meg and I have recognized for a long time, which is that we balance each other out. Meg is the “ying to my yang.” Things that I struggle with are often her strengths, and vice versa. We’re a perfect match in so many ways.

 

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